Future Perfect Continuous Form (also called the future progressive)

We form the future perfect continuous by adding the future continuous form of ‘be’ following the noun and before an ing verb. Sometimes we add an object and a time word to complete the sentence:

Subject + ‘will have been’ + present participle (verb + ing) + object + time word

Positive Form

Subject Future Perfect Continuous form of ‘be’ Present Participle

(Verb + ing)

Object Time Word
I

You

She

He

It

We
They

will have been working

sleeping

studying

cooking

growing

exercising

travelling

here

on the sofa

at the library

the feast

there

on the treadmill

on the train

for years.

since midnight.

since 8 am.

for hours.

for a decade by then.

since dawn.

for about four hours.

 

Negative Form

Subject Future Perfect Continuous form of ‘be’ (Negative) Present Participle (Verb + ing)
I

You

She
He

It

We
They

will + not + have been

(long form)

 

won’t have been

(short form)

working

sleeping

baking

living

drying

sailing

singing

Note: Non-action verbs do not use the future perfect continuous tense

Non-action verbs like ‘To be’; ‘to seem’; ‘to know’ only take the future perfect tense:

will + have + past participle.

For example:

Correct:              By Friday, we will have known each other for one week.

Incorrect:           By Friday, we will have been knowing each other for one week

Questions

Questions are formed by

‘Will’ + Subject + ‘have been’ + Verb+ing

Verb Subject Future Perfect Present Participle (Verb + ing)
Will I

you

she

he

it

we

they

have been sleeping?

studying?

listening?

working?

ringing?

sailing?

driving?

 

‘Wh’ Questions

 

‘Wh’ Word Verb Subject

Future Perfect

Where

Why

What

Who

How long

will I

you

she

he

it

we

they

have been

 

Usage

The future perfect continuous form is also called the future progressive. It is not common in English but it does have its place when we are talking about an ongoing action that will continue until some point in the future.

  • I will have been working at the bank for six years next September.
  • She won’t have been travelling for very long.
  • Where will you have been visiting when your trip is over?
  • Will you have been studying all night before the examination?
  • They will not have been driving for more than an hour by the time they get there.
  • Why will he have been working for so long without a rest?
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